Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Michael Weisman Public Key

Greetings All,

In the name of all things honest, here is my public key. Read further down  to learn how and why to use it.

-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
Version: Mailvelope v0.7.0
Comment: Email security by Mailvelope - http://www.mailvelope.com
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=ssJN
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----


Use this public key to encrypt email you send to me, or decrypt email received from me. You can do this by copying everything in between the BEGIN and END lines, including those lines, and importing this into your email encryption/decryption client. several options exist, but here are my suggestions.

If you are using a webmail client (gmail, yahoo, hotmail, etc) try www.mailvelope.com.

If you are using Firefox, Chrome, or MS Outlook (otherwise known as LOOK OUT!), there are plenty of add-in's to choose from, none of which I'm familiar with.

So...moving on...

Sending email to me:

Use this key to encrypt your email. When you send it, I am the only one who can open that mail, using my private key.

Receiving email from me:

When you receive an email from me, and it's encrypted, open the email using this key. In that way, you will know that the email came from me, and only me, because it was encrypted with my private key.

How does this work?

The detailed explanation can be found on Wikipedia: Public Key Cryptography

For the less inclined, I offer a very simplistic explanation of Public Key Encryption below.

On my computer, I create what is called a "key pair" using software specifically for that purpose. This is completely legal, and there is nothing nefarious or questionable about this practice.

Creating a key pair is like a decoder ring, but better. Two codes, or "keys" are created, a public key and a private key.

The private key is just that, private. I keep it in a very safe place, and never, ever, share it with anyone.

The public key is, as its name implies, public. This is what you have access to.

The public and private key are a very special "matched set". They are so special, that anything I encrypt with my private key, can only be decrypted with my public key. Likewise, anything you encrypt with my public key, can only be decrypted with my private key.

Why is this important?

This is very important because using this type of encryption ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEES the following:
 authentication, non-repudiation and confidentiality.

1. Authentication: Since the email can only be decrypted with the matching public key to my private key, you know that email you receive from me, CAN ONLY BE SENT BY ME.

2. Non-repudiation: Since the email can only be encrypted with the private key matching my public key, you know that email you received, could only have been sent BY me.

3. ConfidentialityWhen you use your private key, with my public key, to send email to me, or I use my private key and your public key to send email to you, our communications are completely private. Only you can read what I send to you, and only I can read what you send to me. 

Thank you for taking the time to read this, and for implementing this method, for your email communications with me. It's a small thing, but important in so many ways. I appreciate your acknowledgement of my values.

Respectfully,

Michael Weisman